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The Foreign Policy of Germany and Thailand in the Era of Otto von Bismarck and King Chulalongkorn in Comparative Perspective

Thailand and Germany have a successful history of almost 160 years of bilateral relations, in the fields of trade and economic cooperation as well as in the cultural, scientific and educational fields and are intensifying their people-to-people relations. During the 19th century, Prussia, and later the German Empire, was an absolute monarchy. Domestically, it was at the crossroads between the old policies of an institutional balance of power and a new policy of Realpolitik. Internationally, Bismarck decided to bind the other European powers to Germany with secret alliance and treaties in order to maintain the status quo. At the same time, Siam (Thailand) made efforts to resist colonial powers. King Chulalongkorn (r. 1868–1910) had the wisdom to understand that Thailand would have to be modernized if she wanted to preserve her independence. Therefore, the King visited Europe twice, in 1897 and 1907. Significantly, the two visits to Europe of King Chulalongkorn were considered vital for the survival of Siam in the time of European colonization. They strengthened the diplomatic relations between Thailand and Germany which were forged during the Eulenburg mission of 1862. In this lecture, Social Constructivism and Linkage Politics are used as theoretical frameworks to analyze the foreign policies of both Germany and Thailand in terms of national identity building through foreign policy action as well as to compare the bilateral relations of the two countries.

Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 3.15 p.m.
Room 122 Universität Hamburg Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1, Flügel Ost
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Thai Tag 2017

Colloquium: Vor 250 Jahren: der Fall Ayutthayas und die Gründung ThonburisColloquium: Thonburis
(250 Years Ago: Commemorating the Fall of Ayutthaya(Ayutthaya and the Founding of Thonburi)

December 9, 2017 9:30 – 17:15 Room 221

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Veranstaltung am 9.11.2017 an der Universität Hamburg

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Buddhism, knowledge, and power: Reflections on the modern fashioning of a tradition, from global to local contexts

Proponents of using the umbrella term ‘Buddhism’ as an encompassing category for an ensemble of traditions developed and preserved by diverse populations in South, East, and Southeast Asia, have long succeeded in establishing it as a full-right member in the family of ‘world religions’. The apparent naturalness of the concept hides the complex processes through which the category itself and its defining features have historically taken shape in different Asian (and now also non-Asian) localities, where ‘Buddhism’ has always been entangled in intricate webs of knowledge and power.

Dienstag, den 7. November 2017
Zeit: 18:00-20:00
Ort: Raum 122
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost

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Virtual Scripts: New Technologies and the Self-fashioning of Monastic Identities in Contemporary Sipsong Pann

Sipsong Panna, in Yunnan (China), has been long part of the ‘cultural region of the tham script’ in mainland Southeast Asia. Nevertheless, tham texts, and with them temple education as a whole, struggle to find its relevance today. While textual knowledge is valued among village communities, the temporary nature of ordination accounts for the little interest most Lue monastics show toward the study of Buddhist and vernacular books. Since the state led development of a reformed, simplified alphabet for Tai language in the 1950s circumscribed the use of tham texts to the temple, present day Lue novices and young monks in particular seem to attach more value to the mastering of contemporary mediums of communication whose main language of communication is Mandarin.

Dienstag, den 7. November 2017
Zeit: 14:00-16:00
Ort: Raum 232
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost

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„Luk-Thung-Lieder“, eine thailändische, volkstümliche Liedart: humorvoll und gesellschaftskritisch

Der Vortrag behandelt das Genre der volkstümlichen Luk-Thung-Lieder, eine Volksliedart aus dem Nordosten Thailands. Luk-Thung-Lieder sind unter den Thais sehr populär, zum einen wegen des fröhlichen Rhythmus, zum anderen wegen ihrer lustigen, zuweilen spöttischen Texte, welche das Leben und die Gesellschaft des ländlichen Thailand widerspiegeln.

Samstag, den 13. Mai 2017
Zeit: 15 Uhr
Ort: Raum 221
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost

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Buddhism and its others local comparisons of ritual and religion in upland Laos

Buddhism and its others local comparisons of ritual and religion  in upland Laos will be conducted by Guido Sprenger. Prof. Sprenger is Professor of Social Anthropology at the Institute of Ethnology, University of Heidelberg since 2010. He has done research on ritual, cosmology and transculturality in the uplands of Laos since 2000. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Academia Sinica, Taipei, from 2004 to 2007, and a Junior Professor in Münster, Germany, from 2007 to 2010. He has published his research in the Journal of Asian Studies, Anthropological Theory, Anthropology Today and others. His research interests include ritual, exchange, human-environment relations, animism, kinship and social morphology, cultural identity, gender and sexuality.

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Donnerstag den 4. Mai 2017
Zeit: 18 ct
Ort: Raum 122
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1
Flügel Ost


Buddhist Mobilities in Early Southeast Bagan and Angkor Re-considered

Buddhist Mobilities in Early Southeast  Bagan and Angkor Re-considered will be conducted by Dr. Tilman Frasch.  Dr. Tilman Frasch is Reader in Asian History at the Department of History, Politics & Philosophy at Manchester Metropolitan University. He studied South Asian History, Indian Languages (Indology) and European History at Heidelberg University, where he also gained MA and PhD degrees with dissertations on the early history of Myanmar (Burma). After teaching at Heidelberg University and holding research fellowships at Manchester and Singapore he joined MMU in 2006.

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Dienstag, den 2. Mai 2017
Zeit: 16:00 – 18:00
Ort: VMP-6 Hörsaal F Universität Hamburg Von Melle Park 6


Die Universität Hamburg präsentiert im Sommersemester 2017 eine interessante Ringvorlesung unter dem Motto »Flows of Change: Rivers, Megacities and Mobility in Southeast Asia«

Die Universität Hamburg präsentiert im Sommersemester 2017 eine interessante Ringvorlesung unter dem Motto »Flows of Change: Rivers, Megacities and Mobility in Southeast Asia«. Das umfangreiche Vortragsprogramm ist öffentlich und wird im Rahmen des Allgemeinen Vorlesungswesens angeboten. Der Besuch der Vorträge ist kostenlos. Zugangsvoraussetzungen oder Teilnahmebeschränkungen gibt es nicht. Eine Anmeldung ist nicht erforderlich. Mehrere Vorträge haben einen Bezug zu Thailand und seinen Nachbarn Birma, Laos und Kambodscha.

 

Die Serie beginnt am Dienstag, den 11. April um 16 Uhr ct, ORT: Philosophenturm Raum F (Von-Melle-Park 6) und endet am 4. Juli.


Ten Months after the Change of Government in Myanmar – What has Really Changed?

The lecture will be divided in three parts.

The first one will give an overview on Myanmar’s hybrid political culture in which Buddhist (notably the tradition of the Mahasammata) and Western elements are merged.

Part two will present some experiences from a recent visit to the country in January 2016.

The last section will try to draw some conclusions about the future developments.

 

Mittwoch den 25. Januar 2017

Zeit: 18 ct
Ort: Raum 232
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost


Translated for the Glass Cabinet Only? Thai Translations of Buddha’s Word Examined in Their Cultural Context

Buddhism in contemporary Thailand is labelled “Theravada Buddhism” while the “Pali canon”, or the “Tipitaka”, is regarded as the canonical scriptures of this branch of Buddhism. In this lecture, Susanne Ott will not only reflect on canonization and the general role of translation in creating “-isms” and underpinning identities and power relations. She will mainly draw from her context-oriented research about the Thai translations of the Tipitaka, thereby viewing translation not as a merely linguistic but as a cultural phenomenon. Driven by the question as to why Thai translations of the Tipitaka are sometimes criticized for their poor intelligibility and “clunkiness”, the following aspects will be reflected on: the role of the scriptures, the purpose of the translations, target audience, agents involved in translating and the place of politics in the whole process, the different concepts and ideas about translation used in various contexts and fields in Thailand, traditional Pali education and other related aspects of cultural history.

Dienstag 17.01.2017

18:15-19:45 Uhr

Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1

Asien-Afrika-Institut: Raum 120


Rulers, Guardians, Arbitrators? The Military and Democratization in Myanmar

Myanmar’s democratization has been described as one of the most remarkable political openings of the last half decade outside of the political changes in the Arab world. After nearly 50 years of military rule, President Thein Sein has introduced far reaching political reforms that have transformed the long term military regime. These reforms culminated in the historic November 8, 2015 elections and brought a democratic regime under the informal leadership of State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi into power. What is the role of the military in this process? How can we explain the military’s behavior during the last half-decade? The lecture demonstrates that the military is guarding the political system from a position of strength. Moreover, the challenges for the new democratic government to establish a civilian control over the military in the midst of a rapidly changing state will be discussed.

Montag den 7. November 2016
Zeit: 18 –20 Uhr
Ort: Raum 120
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1, Flügel Ost


The Political Role of the Military in Myanmar and Thailand

While the histories of the involvement of the Myanmar and Thai armies in politics are very different, for a variety of reasons, they are both currently in much the same position, despite the apparent contrast between the Thai army which now rules in its own name and the Myanmar army which not. Created by contrasting types of regimes and circumstances, they have come to share similar perceptions of their roles and obligations in domestic politics. With an emphasis on the Myanmar case, contrasting with the situation in recent years in Thailand, the lecture will attempt to assess the possibilities for future civil-military relations in Thailand and Myanmar. Much remains unknown and perhaps unknowable, but the past may point to the future. Analysis needs to avoid making sweeping generalisations but look at the facts on the ground before offering prognostications.

Dienstag, den 28. Juni 2016
Zeit: 18 –20 Uhr
Ort: Raum 232
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost


The Border Dispute between Thailand and Cambodia at the temple of Preah Vihear: Recollections of my personal encounters

More than half a century ago, in June 1961, the young German engineer Dr. Ackermann, was assigned by the streamlet marked on an obviously erroneous 1907 French map. The real watershed, stipulated as the border line in the Franco-Siamese treaty of 1904, would have left the whole temple complex under Thai sovereignty. The 1962 International Court of Justice (ICJ) verdict in favour of Cambodia was not due to, but rather in spite of, Dr. Ackermann’s crucial findings because the exact watershed was not considered decisive by the majority of judges who insisted on the Thai tacit acceptance of the formerly submitted French map. Professor Ackermann is one of the very few witnesses of the 1962 ICJ trial still alive today. Therefore, his personal recollections represent an extraordinary and unique resource for understanding the still unresolved Preah Vihear temple dispute between Thailand and Cambodia.

Dienstag, den 21. Juni 2016
Zeit: 18 c.t.
Ort: Raum 232
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost


Christianity and the Refashioning of Theravada Buddhism in Nineteenth-Century Siam

In this presentation the lecturer will examine the interplay between knowledge transfer and the Christian mission in nineteenth-century Siam. From c. 1830 onwards, discussions on religion became a central arena of conflict between rival regimes of knowledge, confronting ‘traditional’ Thai Buddhist views on nature and man’s existence with the ideals and practices of science and rationality transmitted from Europe and the USA. He will argue that the Christian doctrine played a crucial role for the transformation of Siamese Buddhism into a ‘rational’ faith compatible with modern science, while the Christian mission was a failure in terms of conversions. ‘Modern’ Buddhism then not only became an important source for cultural self assertiveness in the face of Western colonialism, but also a central ideology for pushing Siamese claims for religious leadership in the Theravada Buddhist world.

 

Dienstag, den 24. Mai 2016
Zeit: 18 c.t.
Ort: Raum 124
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost


การบรรยายพิเศษในหัวข้อ สมเด็จพระเทพรัตนราชสุดา ฯ สยามบรมราชกุมารีกับการประพาสภาษา ศิลปะ และวัฒนธรรมตะวันตก

การบรรยายพิเศษในหัวข้อ สมเด็จพระเทพรัตนราชสุดา ฯ สยามบรมราชกุมารีกับการประพาสภาษา ศิลปะ และวัฒนธรรมตะวันตก โดยศาสตราจารย์พิเศษ ดร. อำภา โอตระกูล ภาควิชาภาษาตะวันตก จุฬาลงกรณ์มหาวิทยาลัย

วันเสาร์ที่ 21 พฤษภาคม 2559
เวลา 10.30 – 12.30 น.
ณ สถานเอกอัครราชทูต ณ กรุงเบอร์ลิน (อาคารวิลล่า)
Lepsiusstr, 64/66, 12163 Berlin

ผู้สนใจโปรดลงทะเบียนที่ E-Mail : protocol@thaiembassy.de


The Story of Humanitarian Assistance to the Karen in Eastern Burma and beyond

In this talk the lecturer gives ethnographic impression in the ways that humanitarian assistance was organized to the refugee camps, to the migrants in Northwestern Thailand on the Thai-Burmese border and to internally displaced persons in Eastern Burma. Further, the lecturer argues that humanitarian assistance has also fueled the imagination of a Karen homeland in a context of devastation of the Karen landscape in Eastern Burma. Humanitarian assistance then boosted in important ways the recovery of a project that was both nationalist and religious. The talk also looks at how the re-entering grassroots humanitarian assistance programs into Burma via Thailand has led to a religious re-awakening and interpretation of the conflict at hand.

Mittwoch, den 4. Mai 2016
Zeit: 18 c.t.
Ort: Raum 123
Universität Hamburg
Asien-Afrika Institut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1,
Flügel Ost


Symposium 2016 „Thailands Rolle in ASEAN“

EINLADUNG

DEUTSCH-THAILÄNDISCHE GESELLSCHAFT ASIEN-AFRIKA-INSTITUT UNIVERSITÄT HAMBURG HAMBURGER GESELLSCHAFT FÜR THAIISTIK

Symposium 2016 „Thailands Rolle in ASEAN“

23.04.2016 in Hamburg

14.00 Uhr Grußworte

• Prof. Dr. Volker Grabowsky, Universität Hamburg
• Prof. Dr. Frauke Kraas, Präsidentin der DTG
• Ihre Exzellenz Nongnuth Phetcharatana, Botschafterin des Königreichs Thailand
• Stefan Krohn, Königlich-Thailändisches Honorarkonsulat Hamburg

14.15 Uhr Ihre Exzellenz Nongnuth Phetcharatana, Botschafterin des Königreichs Thailand: Opportunities and Challenges for Thailand in ASEAN

15.00 Uhr Kaffeepause

15.30 Uhr Prof. Dr. Gerhard Will, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik: ASEAN/EU und ASEAN/China: Thailand in zwei Spannungsfeldern

16.15 Uhr Prof. Dr. Andreas Stoffers, Europäisches Institut für ASEAN-Studien:

17.00 Uhr Paneldiskussion: Sozio-ökonomische Entwicklungen in der ASEAN Thailand: Vom Land des Lächelns zum wirtschaftspolitischen Machtfaktor in ASEAN
Leitung: Prof. Dr. Volker Grabowsky (mit einem Einleitungsreferat von Dr. Michael Waibel, Universität Hamburg)

17.45 Uhr Schlussworte zum Ende des Symposiums

18.00 Uhr Sektempfang

 

Teilnahme und Anmeldungen

Zum Symposium sind Gäste bzw. Nicht-Mitglieder von DTG und HGT selbstverständlich sehr herzlich willkommen. Die Teilnahme am Symposium ist kostenfrei.
Anmeldung und Kontakt: volker.grabowsky@uni-hamburg.de

 

DTG-Mitglieder werden gebeten, sich möglichst bald verbindlich anzumelden unter
Telefon 0221-68 00 210, Fax 0221-96 90 287 oder Mail: info@dtg.eu.

 

Veranstaltungsort
Asien-Afrika-Institut der Universität Hamburg,
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1, 20146 Hamburg (Bahnhof Dammtor)

Wir wünschen Ihnen eine gute Anreise!

Ihre Deutsch-Thailändische Gesellschaft, Ihr Asien-Afrika-Institut Hamburg und Ihre Hamburger Gesellschaft für Thaiistik


Lecture by Prof. Dr. Patrice Ladwig Topic: The empty monastery’. Buddhism and the transformaon of monasc educaon in Laos between urbanizaon and rural migraon

In the last 20 years, Laos has undergone an unprecedented process of economic modernizaon that has also le its marks on Buddhism and monasc instuons. Rapid urbanizaon, rural spaal mobility and new possibilies in the educaonal sector have led to social and cultural transformaons that directly impinge on religious actors, their values and pracces. Especially the social background of Buddhist monks and novices, and the spaal locaon of temples and monasc schools are affected by these processes: Although ordinaon as a monk or novice has tradionally been one opon for social and spaal upward mobility for poor peasant sons, this process has accelerated to such a degree that monasteries in some rural areas have been almost emped, while urban temples are flooded with young novices seeking further educaon and the diversity of city life. By drawing on data from longterm fieldwork in monasteries in the Lao capital Vienane, and smaller temples in more remote province, the paper will explore the increasing gap of rural and urban Buddhism.

Patrice Ladwig studied Social Anthropology and Sociology, and obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2008. He worked at the University of Bristol, the Max Planck Instute for Social Anthropology and was vising professor at the University of Zürich and the University of Hamburg. With a regional specializaon on Laos and mainland Southeast Asia, he works on the anthropology of Theravada Buddhism, death and funeral cultures, religion & communist movements and colonialism. He is editor (with Paul Williams) of Buddhist funeral cultures of Southeast Asia and China (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and currently works on a book on Buddhist socialisms, and a monograph entled Revoluonaries and Reformers in Lao Buddhism.

Mittwoch, den 9. Dezember 2015
Zeit: 18 – 20 Uhr
Ort: Raum 122
Universität Hamburg, Asien-Afrika Instut
Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1, Flügel Ost


Symposium: Buddhism in Thailand and Laos — The “Thaitag” of Winter Semester 2015/16

Symposium: Buddhism in Thailand and Laos — The “Thaitag” of Winter Semester 2015/16
Saturday, 12. December 2015
Asia-Africa-Institute, Universität Hamburg, Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1, East Wing, Room 121

Thailand and Laos are countries where Theravada Buddhism is the dominant religion. It has shaped Thai and Lao culture and society more than any other religion during the last seven or eight centuries at least. The history and practice of Buddhism in Thailand and Laos has been the focus of research at the Department of Languages and Cultures of Southeast Asia over many years. This workshop presents the result of recent research carried out by PhD and MA students. Numata visiting professor Dr. Papod Assavavirulhakarn (Chulalongkorn University), one of the most prominent scholars in the field of Buddhist Studies in Thailand, will give an introductory talk to stimulate further discussion, and Dr. Elisabeth Haderer will introduce treasures of Thai Buddhist art.

13:00 h  Opening Ceremony

13:15 h   Keynote by Prof. Dr. Prapod Assavavirhulhakarn

14:15 h   Khamvone Boulyaphonh, MA

The Reappearance of the Present Buddha Gautama and the End of Buddhism International relations of the Lao Sangha: The participation of the Lao Sangha in the Chaṭṭha Sangāyana and the Buddha Jayanti

15:00 h   Coffee break

15:15 h   Dr. Elisabeth Haderer

16:00 h   Lars Brandt, BA

16:45 h   Bounleuth Sengsoulin, MA

Buddhist Art Treasures from Thailand Phra Buddhadasa Bikkhu’s “Dhammic Socialism“: A Buddhist approach to tackle market failure Buddhist manuscript culture in Laos on the road to modernity: Reflections on anisong manuscripts from Luang Prabang

17:30 h   Closing remarks

17:45 h   End of the symposium

For questions, please do not hesitate to contact Prof. Dr. Volker Grabowsky:
volker.grabowsky@uni-hamburg.de; +49 40 42838-3675